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Tag : Canon

Buttermilk Creek

Because it has such a short watershed Buttermilk Creek tends to run dry for most of the year. With the rain over the past couple of days I decided to gamble and venture out to see what it can really look like. To my good fortune Mother Nature provided me an amazing array of deep rich colours to enjoy. From the green of the moss to the orange, yellow and red of the leaves. Accompanied by the sound of roaring water these gifts were my reward for joining her in the rain.

Post Processing

All of my images are initially downloaded from the memory card to my hard drive using Adobe Lightroom 4. This image is a three image HDR that combines -2EV, 0EV, +2EV to bring out the maximum amount of detail in the shadow and the highlight areas. The images were combined using Nik Software’s HDR Efex Pro 2. After the image merge the image was saved back to Lightroom for some final adjustments to various colour values as well as to add a slight vignette.

Details:

  • Location: Buttermilk Creek, Hamilton, Canada
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D
  • Lens: Sigma 18-200 mm
  • Focal Length: 28mm
  • Aperture: f/11
  • Shutter Speed: .5 sec., 2 sec., 8 sec.
  • ISO: 100
  • Metering Mode: Pattern Metering
  • Tripod: Manfrotto 055CL
  • Manfrotto 486 RC2 ballhead

Scenic Falls, Hamilton, Ontario

This image of Scenic Falls Hamilton Ontario is one of the more challenging images that I have created in quite a while. The sun was quite harsh on the top half of the hill and I was down in some pretty dark shadows.This drastic dynamic range made it a perfect candidate for HDR. I set out by capturing a 5 image/5 f-stop  sequence. With the lack of colour at this time of year I made sure to use a circular polarizer to bring out as much colour as possible. As well, since the flow of water was quite slight on this visit I stacked on a variable neutral density filter to cut out light. Doing this allowed me to have rather long exposures which gives the appearance of a greater flow of water.

Post Processing

All of my images are initially downloaded from the memory card to my hard drive using Adobe Lightroom 4.  For this image, 5 initial images were combined using Nik Software’s HDR Efex Pro 2 then to finish adjustments to various colour values and saturation were made, as well a slight vignette was added.

Details:

  • Location: Scenic Falls, Hamilton
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D
  • Lens: Canon 24-70L
  • Focal Length: 24mm
  • Aperture: f/22
  • Shutter Speed: 2.5 sec., 5 sec., 8 sec., 20 sec., 30 sec.
  • ISO: 100
  • Metering Mode: Pattern Metering
  • Tripod: Manfrotto 055CL
  • Manfrotto 486 RC2 ballhead

 

Billy Monkley Cascade

One foggy October morning in Hamilton, Canada.

Post Processing

All of my images are initially downloaded from the memory card to my hard drive using Adobe Lightroom.  For this image some minor adjustments to various colour values and saturation were made, as well a slight vignette was added.

Details:

  • Location: Billy Monkley Cascade, Mount Albion Conservation Area
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D
  • Lens: Sigma 18-200mm
  • Focal Length: 21mm
  • Aperture: f/22
  • Shutter Speed: 2 sec.
  • ISO: 100
  • Metering Mode: Pattern Metering
  • Tripod: Manfrotto 055CL
  • Manfrotto 486 RC2 ballhead

 

Get out and enjoy the colour!

The leaves may almost be gone but there is still plenty of color to enjoy in Hamilton.

Image Details

  • Location: Mount Albion Conservation Area
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D
  • Lens: Canon EF24-70L
  • Focal Length: 70mm
  • Aperture: f/10
  • Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec.
  • ISO: 640
  • Metering Mode: Pattern Metering
  • Hand Held

Details, details, details…

So I had this grand idea, “I’ll design myself another website based on my photography”. I didn’t think it would be too hard, since my main gig is graphic design. Along with print layout I do websites for many other people. “I should be able to whip together a simple site in a few days”, or so I thought.

This project started back in May. I figured that when I had a little down time between customer jobs I could just poke away at my own site. Well, it didn’t work out that way.

The site you are looking at is based on the WordPress platform. WordPress is very robust and offers a lot of features that I like. One of them being the ability to style the look of a site based upon a theme. How the theme’s code is written will specify where the various rows and columns appear, what the font looks like and what the colour scheme is. I’m a little bit particular about how my work appears and since I don’t write the primary theme code the search for my initial site theme took me weeks to find something close to what I wanted. Once I found what I wanted as a start I then began the arduous task of “tweaking” the design code to customize the styling. On occasion I would spend 3-4 hours in the evening stylizing a single element to make it look the way I wanted.

 

When I got the theme to where I wanted I figured the next part would be easy. I just needed to choose some image files from my photo library, set up a couple of galleries, and get to blogging. Well, that didn’t work out too simply either. My Lightroom 4 Photo Library currently has just over 85,000 images in it. The overwhelming amount of images that I have captured over the years made the gallery selection almost as difficult as the theme selection. Once again I spent weeks looking back at my images, selecting some, re-editing others with newer software to net better results. And, on top of all that, I have recently become very interested in the waterfalls in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, my home town. We have 126 documented waterfalls here and over the summer I began venturing out to capture images of them. I wanted to dedicate gallery space for Hamilton waterfalls on my site so it took a little time to build up a library of images of those too.

With all of that being said, I hope you like what you see and take a couple of minutes to check back every now and then. My plans for this site are more blog oriented. I want to share some of my images that I have captured over the years and maybe write a little about them. I also hope to write about post capture image processing using Lightroom, Photoshop and some other third party software that I use. I will also make every effort to share my camera settings like I have done in the post previous “Buttermilk Creek”. I know I have learned much from seeing other photographers settings as I hope you will from mine.

To enhance or not enhance?

Recently I, along with others, was on the receiving end of some criticism for the style of images that I post on a certain user group on Facebook. The group is comprised of outdoors enthusiasts that specifically enjoy the number and variety of waterfalls in Hamilton, Ontario (The Waterfall Capital of the World – 140 waterfalls) Many of the members post images of the various falls that they visit on their outings and the comments (usually positive) ensue.

Recently however one member decided to post his image (which was very good) but added the caption “This was taken with a camera” to which he followed “My photos are not “PLAYED WITH”. All I do is a little color correction and exposure setting and maybe a little unsharp mask. I try to get it right in the camera first and not rely on photo shop to fix what should have been done in the camera.” 

As you might expect the flaming arrows started to fly back and forth. I sat back and followed the thread with interest to see where it would go. Part way along the moderator intervened to control the situation and to his credit he did not delete any of the posts. There were a few additional posts of support for the original “not “PLAYED WITH”” guy as well as his detractors who like me “PLAY WITH” our photos.

Below is one of my photos (before and after) that I am sure was the subject of the “PLAYED WITH” comment. My minds eye saw an image that my camera could not capture. With the help of Adobe Lightroom I got pretty close to the image I had envisioned when I pressed the shutter release.

So here is my question, when is it OK to edit a photo and when do you stop?